Nassington Road (Sycamore Close)

In 1951, Woodnewton inhabitants experienced a major change to their village – a new development was to be built alongside the edge of Lindsey field which was used as the playing field.  A row of five semi-detached houses were planned facing east across the fields to Fotheringhay. No such building work had been seen in Woodnewton since 1919, when Lord Brassey of Apethorpe Hall commissioned a row of four semi detached cottages (St Mary’s Hill) to be  built for his employees at the west end of the village, behind the church.

The District Council, way back in 1937 must have considered that Woodnewton was ripe for development, as the RDC wrote to the PC asking if they could suggest any possible building sites. The Parish Council responded that the RDC Housing Committee should come and inspect the village themselves and state their requirements. No further communication was received on this issue.

At a Parish Council meeting on 6th February 1945, it was noted that the clerk was asked to write to the RDC asking if the Council would allow six houses to be built in the village.  No reply was recorded.

The new houses all had three bedrooms, bathroom and upstairs toilet. Unfortunately, the builders went bust after completing numbers 1 -6, so a new builder was brought in.  This meant that the first six houses were of a different plan: they had a kitchen diner and the other four had a kitchen and a large lounge. They all had a toilet, wash house, coal house and shed under a flat roof outside the back door. The wash house was fed with hot and cold water, and also a soft water tap fed from a cold water tank on the flat roof, which was filled with rainwater from the roof, and also a storage tank for watering the back gardens.

The new houses all had three bedrooms, bathroom and upstairs toilet. Unfortunately, the builders went bust after completing numbers 1 -6, so a new contractor was brought in.  This meant that the first six houses were of a different plan: they had a kitchen diner and the other four had a kitchen and a large lounge. They all had a toilet, wash house, coal house and shed under a flat roof outside the back door. The wash house was fed with hot and cold water, and also a soft water tap fed from a cold water tank on the flat roof, which was filled with rainwater from the roof, and also a storage tank for watering the back gardens. 

It took the CC until February 1957, to install a path in front of the houses, despite the PC requesting this work be carried out from 1955.  At the same time the PC asked the CC for the boundary wall to be repaired, which was incredible considering, that initially, the PC asked for it to be demolished.  The wall we see today is the repaired wall with a concrete capping instead of the original stones which stood on their edge.

Families in the village were allocated these properties, and what a life changing experience it would have been for them as some previously had been living in the old stone cottages which were without modern conveniences.  When the houses were completed in the summer of 1951 the following families moved in: 

  1. Charlie and Nellie Atkins with two children, Jean and Charles
  2. Charlie (Chuck) Compton and Jannie Compton (nee Brown) with two children, Vera and Peter
  1.  Charlie (Nattie) Britten and Mrs. Britten with two children, Vera and Dorothy
  2. Reuben (Jack) Bellairs and Kathleen Bellairs (nee Black) with three children, Peter, Robert and Jane
  1. Harley and Gladys Sutton (nee Dixon) with one child, John
  2. George (Joe) Pridmore and Margaret Pridmore with children, Leonard and Alfie
  3. Fred Skinner and Adeline Skinner with children, Colin, Mary and Raymond
  4. Joseph (Jerry) Hollowell and Mary Hollowell (nee Bellairs) with children, Shirley, Brian, Edward and Terence
  1. George (Josh) Moisey and Ruth (Meggie) Moisey (nee Sharman) with children, David and Joan

10 . Norman and Rennie Whalley (nee Knight) with children, Judy, Nicholas, Clifford and Stephen

Chris Coutts, relative of the original family, still lives at “No. 7”.

The minutes of the Parish Council for February 1952 give the address of the new development as “Sycamore Close”, named after the tree at the centre of the nearby Village Green. Later, the sign was amended to read “Nassington Road including Sycamore Close”.

2020